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Aug 03, 2006

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Chumani

Worse than people who stay tooned in what you were 5 years ago, it's when they never bothered to get tooned at all... I had a boy-friend who kept on giving me presents who were not me. They were his idea of how things (presents) should be. For instance, he would give me a golden ring when I don't like and I don't wear gold. I'm a silver type :)

Just a side note: for quite some time this has been my favourite blog (well, I must say I don't read hundreds of blogs!:)), and I really don't remember anymore how I came here in the first place; anyway, it was just a while ago that I realised that your teacher is Adyashanti. Guess what, for the last two years or so I've been reading and listening to everything I find about him (and passing it to my friends here in Europe, even Zen teachers) and I'm crossing the Atlantic next week to meet him for the first time for a retreat in East Coast.

I will keep up with reading you. Thanks!

Steve Gillmor

Evelyn --

Your comments are dead on, except for a misunderstanding about who the gestures are intended for: information sources who are looking for people willing to receive their feed.

Automation is not the point here: it's the user in charge. End loop.

Evelyn Rodriguez

Thanks Chumani for the very kind note. You will love Adya much much more in person. While in Europe, you might want to check out Karl Renz (Germany) and Daniel Odier (France). If you ever come to California, please let me know.

Steve, Thanks so much for your attention ;-)

I suppose what I really intended is written between the lines but not that obscurely either. The whole attention "problem" is a perceived problem, a non-problem, and yes, granted there are certainly plenty of market opps in perceived problems.

I like what Fred wrote a while back AND I'd take it a step further into realms some would consider woo-woo, but is simpler than that. Fred wrote: "I find that my family, friends, colleagues, and readers emailing me links, tagging them for me in delicious, and leaving them in the comments is the single most useful way to stay on top of what's important."

At least seven or more years ago I took a 12-week Artists Way class (based on the book) and one of the exercises involved going on a media fast for a week. I thought they must be crazy. I cannot function without being in the 'know'. At that time I probably received just about every technical and business publication published under the moon - this is probably after RSS was an apple in Dave Winer's eye but certainly before RSS readers were in vogue and we felt we actually had to read the 10,714 unread feed items in FeedDemon. One could throw out your back picking up one day's mail - it was so mind-boggling.

Other than being able to answer each piece of email I receive, today I have absolutely no information overload or 'attention' problems. Nada. About four years ago I started to experiment with intuition. I didn't even know what the idea of it truly meant, but I was curious to see what would happen if I stopped reading news, stopping subscribing to everything...perhaps might the world stop spinning?

No, just my mind stopped spinning. I started to find that the information that I actually absolutely needed would come to me somehow or another. I'd see the front page if it were relevant to me folded neatly in a cafe or a particular book that I had never heard of would be recommended by various friends all within the same week and it would be the perfect timely book, etc. etc.

I still read media, obviously, but I don't go out of my way to seek it all out. I don't know that much about Gesture Lab, but I was looking at Touchstone Gadget's blog and I had to chuckle that their algorithm is called, I-AM (Intuitive Attention Management). And explained as:

" "I-AM" who I know.
"I-AM" what I read.
"I-AM" where I am.
"I-AM" how I work.
"I-AM" me.

I-AM is all about measuring your personal behaviour, the behaviour of who you know, the collective interests of the broader community, the situation you are actually in, the device you're on and how busy you are to determine personal relevancy at any given time."

I suppose one could say I have a Higher Power doing that filtering for 'me', but that wouldn't be entirely accurate either. when I am truly attentive, then I am present, then trust in universe naturally follows.

As far as the feed publishers looking for people willing to receive their feed, oh, yes, now THEY might feel I have an attention problem since I am not subscribing to their glorious feed. But should I have need to know of it, I am absolutely certain that I will - even without any algorithm.

I AM. Period.

(p.s. Links to sources above:
http://avc.blogs.com/a_vc/2006/06/is_meta_better.html
AND
http://www.touchstonegadget.com/blog/2006/06/personal-relevancy.html

Chumani

Thanks so much for the very very valuable tip! :)

Chumani

Thanks so much for the very very valuable tip! :)

Siona

Oh, Evelyn. I just wanted to thank you for your comment, and so voice a heartfelt YES! at your words. It's not to say I don't appreciate those who do keep their quivering frontal lobes - and, occasionally, their core identities - pressed to the pulse of the media, but what you wrote about intuition and the mere comfortable sense of being resonated so much more deeply with me. It's funny to me how we'll overlook the overwhelming amount of information and meaning packed into every immediate moment (and accessible through our own senses!) for the impoverished, pre-digested, spelled-out variety. But I digress.

I am. Thank you.

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