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« There Are Many Ways To Tell Stories | Main | Signature Voices, And Perhaps What I Learned About Branding While Strolling Galleries »

Jul 22, 2005

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» Scrap Performance Appraisals - Part 1 from Management Craft
A friend of mine, who is a HR department head, challenged me to come up with the alternative to performance appraisal systems. She, like many of you, has heard me say time and again that they are a waste of [Read More]

» Scrap Performance Appraisals - Part 1 from Management Craft
A friend of mine, who is a HR department head, challenged me to come up with the alternative to performance appraisal systems. She, like many of you, has heard me say time and again that they are a waste of [Read More]

Comments

Lisa Haneberg

The question about what is truth and a lie is interesting. The question of whether it matters is interesting too. I agree that we are constantly reshaping and redefining realities of the past and present. Some might feel a need to document the "actual truth" but that seems so futile.

History is culture, not facts. Historians research and retell story.

In the work I do with breakthroughs, this train of thought is central to huge breakthroughs. We can select the context from which we think and we can create our reaility and truth to result in a rainbow of outcomes, only a few end in gold.

I like your idea about writing into something, about experiencing the now and creating and building on our thoughts and feelings now.

I know a lot of fiction and poetry writers talk about how the work takes on a life of its own, that the ending and all the details are not known when the writing begins. I have not heard many (any) nonfiction writers talk about the process this way. Outlines are the norm and the book proposal asks for bullets for each chapter that can effectively squash any real magic that might happen. If we let it.

I am intrigued at the notion of writing a nonfiction book in this way. It seems more fun, more adventurous, and more genuine. Honestly, the usual way bores me.

Having been at the same Taos conference, I too, was struck by Hillerman's stories about the Navajo, who he clearly respects a great deal. I would like to learn more about the Navajo culture and beliefs, and not from a nonfiction book written by something with an outline and predetermined plan.

Thanks for the perspective and I look forward to reading your evolving business plan!

Evelyn Rodriguez

Hi Lisa,
I was exploring the nature of time philosophically a bit here, but not necessarily idly. It influences how we act.

Your question is a good one that applies outside of non-fiction book proposals. I'll attempt to answer it soon in a post. You can divide the task into reporting and writing. Sometimes we've only done cursory reporting when the book proposal (or whatever) is due. But still, even the writing experience itself can be an exploration. I'll explain what I mean soon.

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